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Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

3 edition of Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney found in the catalog.

Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney

James F. Simon

Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney

slavery, secession, and the president"s war powers

by James F. Simon

  • 316 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published by Simon & Schuster in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Secession,
  • Law and legislation,
  • War and emergency powers,
  • Slavery,
  • Executive power,
  • History

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementJames F. Simon
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsKF4545.S5 S55 2006
    The Physical Object
    Pagination324 p. ;
    Number of Pages324
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL24962201M
    ISBN 10074325032X
    ISBN 109780743250320
    LC Control Number2006044399

    A fine book." -- J. Michael Parker, San Antonio Express-News, " Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney is a forceful reminder that the Civil War was more than a conflict of soldiers and that, under the rule of law, the decisions of courts could make fully as much difference -- and be fully as much of a struggle -- as the results of battles.   Overall, 'Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney' is a good book for readers who are looking for a Cliff-Notes sorta take on Lincoln, Taney, and the important judicial rulings during the Civil War. The author, who is a professor of law at New York Law School, avoids /5(31).

    The clashes between President Abraham Lincoln and chief justice Roger B. Taney over slavery, secession, and the president's constitutional war powers went to the heart of Lincoln's Simon, author of the acclaimed What Kind of Nation -- an account of the battle between President Thomas Jefferson and Chief Justice John Marshall to define the new nation -- brings to vivid life the. James Simon talked about his book, Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney: Slavery, Secession, and the President’s War Powers, published by Simon and Schuster. Professor Simon examined the relationship.

      Lincoln ignored Taney's protest, convinced that his actions were both constitutional and necessary to preserve the Union. Almost years after Lincoln's and Taney's deaths, their words and actions reverberate in constitutional debate and political battle. Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney tells their dramatic story in fascinating : Simon & Schuster. Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney: Slavery, Secession, and the President's War Powers by James F. Simon (, Hardcover) at the best online prices at eBay! Free shipping for many products!


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Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney by James F. Simon Download PDF EPUB FB2

Overall, 'Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney' is a good book for readers who are looking for a Cliff-Notes sorta take on Lincoln, Taney, and the important judicial rulings during the Civil War.

The author, who is a professor of law at New York Law School, avoids writing in a boring academic by: 8. Roger B. Taney () succeeded John Marshall () as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court. Taney served at Attorney General for Andrew Jackson ( /5.

The clashes between President Abraham Lincoln and Chief Justice Roger B. Taney over slavery, secession, and the president's constitutional war powers went to the heart of Lincoln's presidency.

James Simon, author of the acclaimedWhat Kind of Nation, brings to vivid life the passionate struggle during the worst crisis in the nation's history, the Civil War/5(5).

Overall, 'Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney' is a good book for readers who are looking for a Cliff-Notes sorta take on Lincoln, Taney, and the important judicial rulings during the Civil War.

The author, who is a professor of law at New York Law School, avoids writing in a boring academic style. It's a fast read/5(35). About The Book The clashes between President Abraham Lincoln and Chief Justice Roger B.

Taney over slavery, secession, and the president's constitutional war powers went to the heart of Lincoln's ed on: Novem KIRKUS REVIEW An examination of the differences over the Constitution’s meaning that separated Abraham Lincoln, most revered president, from Roger Taney, most reviled Chief Justice.

Honorable and gentlemanly, deeply religious (he freed his own slaves) and widely learned, Taney succeeded John Marshall as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.

This surprisingly taut and gripping book by NYU law professor Simon (What Kind of Nation) examines the limits of presidential prerogative during the Civil War. Lincoln and Supreme Court Chief. LINCOLN AND CHIEF JUSTICE TANEY: Slavery, Secession, and the President's War Powers User Review - Kirkus An examination of the differences over the 4/5(3).

Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney. New York: Simon & Schuster, Pp. James F. Simon provides scholars and general readers with an interesting and absorbing chronicle of the views and actions of Roger Brooke Taney and Abraham Lincoln on slavery, secession, and the president's war powers during the Civil War and the preceding : Roger C.

Cramton. James F. Simon has written an exciting and notable book where Abraham Lincoln and Roger B. Taney, the president and the chief justice, two men of the highest intelligence and passionate judgment, argues the future of this democratic republic."Author: James F Simon.

Simon wrote this book for general readers (as indicated by the oddly asymmetric title, which suggests that Simon thought his audience would not recognize Taney without being further identified as chief justice).

Most readers will enjoy immensely this crisply written, well-researched book. Simon tells a good story and tells it well. Roger Brooke Taney (/ ˈ t ɔː n i / TAW-nee; Ma – Octo ) was the fifth Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, holding that office from until his death in He delivered the majority opinion in Dred Scott rd (), ruling that African-Americans could not be considered citizens and that Congress could not prohibit slavery in the territories of the United Education: Dickinson College (BA).

Book Review: Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney: Slavery, Secession and the President’s War Powers by James E.

Simon. Those of us with a cursory knowledge of American history, like myself, have heard of the Dred Scott decision ofin which Supreme Court Chief Justice Roger B. Taney opined that the black man had no rights that the white man was bound to honor. Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney tells their dramatic story in fascinating detail.

PUBLISHERS WEEKLY SEP 4, This surprisingly taut and gripping book by NYU law professor Simon (What Kind of Nation) examines the limits of presidential prerogative during the Civil War.5/5(1). On March 4,in what must have been one of the most intriguing moments to witness in American history, Abraham Lincoln took the presidential oath of office from Chief Justice Roger B.

Taney. Most Americans know the name of Abraham Lincoln, but many people do not know that of Roger Brooke Taney, the fifth Chief Justice of the United States and the first Roman Catholic to reach this exalted position.

This book by James F. Simon, the Martin Professor of Law and Dean Emeritus at New York Law School, is more about Taney than Lincoln, zigzagging between their stories untilwhen Lincoln. Roger B. Taney () succeeded John Marshall () as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court.

Taney served at Attorney General for Andrew Jackson () before being appointed as Chief Justice. Taney was a southern aristocrat but had freed his slaves. Apparently, he did not believe in slavery. Lincoln and Taney were in constant disagreement over the interpretation of the Constitution.

The clashes between President Abraham Lincoln and Chief Justice Roger B. Taney over slavery, secession, and the president's constitutional war powers went to the heart of Lincoln's presidency. James Simon, author of the acclaimed What Kind of Nation, brings to vivid life the passionate struggle during the worst crisis in the nation's history /5().

The clashes between President Abraham Lincoln and Chief Justice Roger B. Taney over slavery, secession, and Lincoln's constitutional war powers went to the heart of Lincoln's presidency.

Lincoln and Taney's bitter disagreements began with Taney's Dred Scott opinion inwhen the Chief Justice declared that the Constitution did not grant the black man any rights that the white man was bound to. In this book James F. Simon, the author of a number of legal histories and biographies, presents a concise account of the lives of President Abraham Lincoln and Chief Justice Roger B.

Taney and the constitutional issues that divided : Michael Les Benedict. Lincoln and Taney's bitter disagreements began with Taney's Dred Scott opinion inwhen the chief justice declared that the Constitution did not grant the black man any rights that the white man was bound to honor.

In the famous Lincoln-Douglas debates, Lincoln attacked the opinion as a warped judicial interpretation of the Framers' intent.Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney: Slavery, Secession, and the President's War Powers - Ebook written by James F. Simon. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices.

Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney: Slavery, Secession, and the President's War Powers.4/5(3).Lincoln ignored Taney's protest, convinced that his actions were both constitutional and necessary to preserve the years after Lincoln's and Taney's deaths, their words and actions reverberate in constitutional debate and political battle.

Lincoln and Chief Justice Taney tells their dramatic story in fascinating detail.